HomeBasketProduct SearchFAQs & ContactPress & Media

Latest Publications

The titles featured on this page are our most recent publications.

We published our first book in 1976 and have added many more, together with a range of DVDs, in recent years. Take the opportunity to explore on the site - lots of our authors have contributed short videos to introduce their subject. You'll also find a range of support material - use the 'Support and Resources' button on the left to access units associated with books.

Kett 1549: Rewriting the Rebellion

Due to popular demand we are having to re-print this book. Orders received will not be dispatched until the week commencing 19 November at the earliest.
Much has been written and imagined about Kett’s Rebellion in 1549 including the just released historical novel Tombland by C. J. Sansom, who has also written the foreword to this, Leo R. Jary’s, latest exploration of Norwich’s past. The author attempts to counter the bias of the establishment figures who wrote accounts at the time and, using his military knowledge, establishes a new theory concerning the question that has vexed historians since; the exact location of ‘Dussindale’, the place where Kett was finally defeated. Jary’s own illustrations and maps bring his persuasive research and arguments together in a book that will be of interest to anyone fascinated by Norfolk history, Kett’s Rebellion or Tudor military technology.
Book   Leo R. Jary     ISBN 9781909796577     £9.95     Add this item to your basket

Monks Hall: The History of a Waveney Valley Manor (Hbk) - limited edition

**Hardback - Limited edition**
This story of a Waveney Valley manor house and estate is told through the lives of its owners, occupants and admirers, a tale that spans 1000 years and provides a fascinating social history of rural England in one place, extensively researched and written by someone with a love of the Waveney Valley.

The manor was unusually well documented from medieval times because it was owned by the monks at Thetford Priory, who kept a detailed record of expenditure and gave a description of a house recognisable today, despite its 16th century ‘renovations’. After the dissolution of the priory in the mid 16th century, a succession of owners and scientifically gifted absentee landlords neglected to modernise the hall, leaving it remarkably little changed over the centuries until it was restored and renewed in the 1930s.

The people who lived at Monks Hall weathered famine, riots, plague, religious intolerance and war; their family lives reflect the rigours of country living over a millennium.

Book   Elaine Murphy     ISBN 9781909796546     £29.95     Add this item to your basket

Monks Hall: The History of a Waveney Valley Manor (Pbk)

This story of a Waveney Valley manor house and estate is told through the lives of its owners, occupants and admirers, a tale that spans 1000 years and provides a fascinating social history of rural England in one place, extensively researched and written by someone with a love of the Waveney Valley.

The manor was unusually well documented from medieval times because it was owned by the monks at Thetford Priory, who kept a detailed record of expenditure and gave a description of a house recognisable today, despite its 16th century ‘renovations’. After the dissolution of the priory in the mid 16th century, a succession of owners and scientifically gifted absentee landlords neglected to modernise the hall, leaving it remarkably little changed over the centuries until it was restored and renewed in the 1930s.

The people who lived at Monks Hall weathered famine, riots, plague, religious intolerance and war; their family lives reflect the rigours of country living over a millennium.

Book   Elaine Murphy     ISBN 9781909796553     £14.95     Add this item to your basket

The Zeppelin Raid on Yarmouth

On 19th January 1915 the first air raid over Britain took place when three Zeppelin airships made their way towards the east coast. One turned back due to engine trouble, the other two, bound for Humberside, changed their plans due to bad weather. Instead they set their sights on the small ports of Great Yarmouth and King's Lynn. It was L-3 that struck first dropping bombs and incendiaries on Yarmouth. The result was the first civilian casualties from an air raid in history.

Originally published as the first chapter in his book, Sedgeford Aerodrome and the aerial conflict over North West Norfolk during the First World War, this pamphlet tells the story of that fateful night in world history.

Book   Gary Rossin     ISBN 9781909796560     £2.95     Add this item to your basket

The Baker Brothers: Diaries from the Eastern Front 1914-1919 - Oliver Locker-Lampson and the Cromer Men of the Russian Armoured Car Division

Many diaries were kept through the years of the First World War. In these we move to a little known theatre of war, The Russian Front, and the story of a private fighting force raised in almost the same way local troops were brought together in feudal times. Our focus is two dozen men from the town of Cromer who, together with others from East Anglia, Ulster and further afield made up the Russian Armoured Car Division. Their 'knight' was Oliver Locker-Lampson, Member of Parliament for Ramsey in Huntingdonshire, but with his home in Cromer he relied on justified local loyalty to gather the volunteers he needed.

With the support of his friend, First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, a man not adverse himself to the adventures of war, he used his personal funds and his business connections to equip a Squadron of armoured cars. The Western Front proved an inappropriate place for them to operate and thus the men and cars were shipped to the Russian front, initially to support the armies of the Czar, before finding themselves wondering who their allies were. At that point they were withdrawn before being sent off to a further adventure in Mesopotamia, where the control of oil fields was the critical issue. Recruited as sailors rather than soldiers, the men were pleased to volunteer to be appointed Petty Officers at a rate of pay considerably better than those conscripted as privates in the Army.

Amongst these recruits were the three Baker brothers. Together with friends from the town they found themselves stuck in the frozen north for many months, then transferred to the heat of Turkey, Romania and Galicia. Their respective diaries and letters are woven together to tell a story with little dramatic fighting, and their distance from formal army regulations enabled cameras to be used freely. In fact keen photographer William Baker was charged by Commander Locker-Lampson to keep a record in pictures and his album provides the core of the picture record which accompanies the diaries and letters.

Book   Brenda Stibbons     ISBN 9781909796436     £14.95     Add this item to your basket

Sedgeford Aerodrome and the aerial conflict over North West Norfolk during the First World War

A detailed account of this west Norfolk aerodrome, both through archive research and archaeological excavation carried out by the SHARP team.

The word Zeppelin struck terror into the heart of much of the population of Britain as they realised that, unlike in years past, warfare might arrive in their city or town rather than be confined to some distant battlefield. The story of the Zeppelin raids on Britain has often been told elsewhere but in this publication the author takes the account further by putting the raids into the context of the subsequent development of air power in the east of England, with a particular focus on Sedgeford.

The accounts of the young men who flocked to try their hand at aerial adventure, their training at Sedgeford and the frequent loss of life before reaching a battlefield, are poignant. The skill and daring of Cadbury and Leckie - and their gratitude to have a Night Landing Ground - are the stuff of inter­war story telling. The perceptive accounts of death by fire written by Cadbury - a man from a Quaker family - sit alongside the responses of the populations of King's Lynn and Great Yarmouth as they reacted to injury and death delivered from the skies. The almost hysterical reactions of those who saw spies everywhere are also part of the story.

A particularly valuable aspect of the book is the part of the wireless scientists in the conflict, bringing their knowledge and perception to the efforts to defeat menace at sea and in the air. In a hut perched on the cliff-top at Hunstanton, the technicians scanned the wave bands to alert the fleet or the aircraft to give them the opportunity to gain an advantage of position and time. And in Room 40 at Whitehall, the birth of G.C.H.Q was under way ...

Book   Gary Rossin     ISBN 9781909796423     £14.95     Add this item to your basket


Currency: United Kingdom (£) GBP
Kett 1549: Rewriting the Rebellion
Monks Hall: The History of a Waveney Valley Manor (Pbk)
The Zeppelin Raid on Yarmouth
The Baker Brothers: Diaries from the Eastern Front 1914-1919 - Oliver Locker-Lampson and the Cromer Men of the Russian Armoured Car Division
Sedgeford Aerodrome and the aerial conflict over North West Norfolk during the First World War
Copyright © 2006-2018 Poppyland Publishing, all rights reserved            Terms & Conditions            Privacy and Cookies            site by davidviner.com